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Thread: Course on The Ultimate Guide To Freelance Writing And Getting High Paying Jobs

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    Course on The Ultimate Guide To Freelance Writing And Getting High Paying Jobs

    Part 1/8: An Introduction To Freelance Writing



    What exactly is Freelance Writing? Why do people do it and is there really heaps of money to be made from this profession? Freelance Writing is simply the process of writing for yourself without an employer behind you. You’re not technically employed with a company per se, but you’re writing for yourself.

    Freelance Writing has been around long before the internet became a thing, as newspapers and columns needed likeminded freelance writers to write for them. Why do companies hire freelancers in the first place? You don’t have a commitment or a schedule to keep with a company you work for. You basically take a job for them, give them a quote, give them an estimated time and then that’s when it should be done.

    Companies don’t have to pay freelancers out of pocket health benefits since they’re not technically employed. Some companies see employing freelance writers as an investment rather than a risk of hiring someone from outside the company.

    What’s the typical day like for a freelance writer? Every person varies what they do on their day to day routine but here’s a general description. You’ll wake up; check your e-mail with a coffee on your desk or whatever helps keep you awake and you’ll take it from there. You might have to make a few phone calls and check in with some clients or you might have to make a few marketing calls to pick up some new clients. Seems like pretty gravy work right?

    Freelance writing can be extremely easy but if you’re looking for a get rich quick method to make money, I would highly recommend doing something else. Writing takes an incredible amount of time to get a feel for and make money from. You don’t start out with $100 articles (believe me, that takes a lot of time to find). When I tell people that there are clients out there who pay $100 to $200 for a single 500 word article, they gasp and ask me why.

    Here’s the thing, if you have a blog read by millions of people every month, do you want a $5 writer or a $200 writer? Do you want a writer who will churn out quickly incoherent content just to meet a word requirement or do you want someone who can take an entire day to craft a perfect article? Basically, do you want your readers to keep coming back or leave after reading the first few sentences?

    The difference between a $5 writer and a $200 writer is actually rather simple. Most of the time, a $5 writer looks like this:

    Hello I has you make money contents. I teach make money today web.

    Someone who’s being paid a considerable amount more might look more intelligible.

    Hello, if you’re struggling with bills or just want to make some extra money each month, I’ll show you how!

    I’m not the best salesman in the world but I think you get my point.

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    Part 2/8: Things To Consider

    Writing for a living or even for a side hobby isn’t for everyone. Everyone CAN do it but not everyone should. Here are some things you should probably consider before you decide to get into this profession in the first place.

    #1 – Do you honestly want to write? Does the idea of waking up and pounding on your keyboard seem appealing to you? I mean, truly ask yourself if you want to write for a living and if this is something you really want to do. Not everyone get the hang of it and some people end up giving up in frustration after a couple of months. I wrote for years before I finally figured out how to ditch the low paying clients and start paying bills.

    #2 – Does the idea of doing your own taxes scare you? Well then, I wouldn’t get into this business. More than likely, even if you make enough from writing to claim taxes, you probably won’t make enough to hire an accountant and the nice lady at H&R Block is going to look at you funny when you tell her you write articles on the internet. The majority of your clients will be paying through PayPal and their policies change all the time. You have to stay up to date on those.

    #3 – That’s another thing you need to consider. You need to constantly be aware of PayPal’s policies. Selling articles in some niches can get your account banned and it’s a pain to get PayPal to reconsider. Whenever you call in, you’re talking to an $8 an hour customer service representative. Trust me, they don’t care what your problem is, they just read auto responses from a sheet and send you on your way.

    #4 – You need to understand that you’re not going to strike gold the second you start. It takes some writers years to find a niche that they’re comfortable writing in and to find people who are willing to compensate you fairly for your time. I spent years writing for $1 per 100 words and I don’t recommend it to my worst enemies. Sure, you can rack up some quick work in the summer but it’s not worth. I’ll explain why later in the name your price section.

    #5 – You are going to get discouraged at times and be competing against a lot of cheap writers. Don’t be discouraged when you go to a site like oDesk and see hundreds of people begging for jobs at $1 an hour. I will show you how to get out of that and I will effectively show you how to handle those clients, so they’re never an issue again in a later section.

    If I could go back and tell my former self a bit of advice, it would probably be to not allow myself to sell my soul for so low. I was seriously writing articles for the price of a McDonalds Value Meal at that point. There’s nothing more discouraging and demotivating than to write a well-researched article at $5.

    In the next section (which is probably what you’re reading this entire thing for anyways), I’ll tell you exactly why you’re not getting high paying jobs. It’s probably not even by the fault of your writing either. There’s a specific formula and general tips that most successful writers follow. It’s extremely simple but what you’ve more than likely been doing this entire time is wrong.

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    Part 3/8: Why Canít I Find High Paying Writing Jobs?

    This is one of the most common asked questions of all time when it comes to writing. People want to make money. People want to be able to break free from the $1 per 100 word clients and they want to know that thereís hope out there for them. They want to know that itís entirely possible to make $20 an article or even $100 an article for their time.

    Well, yes and no but Iíll explain that in a minute. Here are a couple of questions to ask yourself before you ask why youíre not getting high paying writing jobs. Do you speak intelligible English? Do you know how to adequately research a topic and write on it? Well congratulations, if you answered both of those questions with a yes, youíre qualified to earn $20 or more an article.

    You see, youíve been stuck in a wasteland known as job boards and forums. I will tell you right now, that the people who pay the big bucks, DO NOT go to forums or job boards. This is something I wish more people understood, but the high paying clients have no idea places like Warrior Forum or Digital Point even exist.

    The very first time I tried to contact a high paying client, I told him my price was $20 per article. Do you know what he told me? Without hesitation, I was rejected because $20 was far too cheap and he was concerned the quality would be crap. Can you believe that? I have been used to writing $5 content all this time and I was being told that I must suck because I only asked for $20 per article? That opened my eyes to a brand new world and showed me that there are clients out there who arenít afraid to pay a specific price for the content they want.

    I want you to keep that in mind when youíre asking yourself why you arenít finding high paying jobs. Would you honestly want to hire you? Think about that for a minute and let that sink in. Letís say youíre hiring a writer for your company and you need someone to provide outstanding quality that your readers will want to read. Now, would you be more interested in the guy who told you he would do it for $5 per article or the guy who charges $50?

    Even on a budget, youíre probably intrigued to see what that $50 writer can offer you arenít you? Real clients know that you have to pay for quality and you get what you pay for. The problem is, youíve been letting cheap clients beat you around the bush for far too long and now youíre stuck writing for them. If you set yourself low, at a $1 per 100 word rate, then you will forever be at that $1 per 100 word rate. You have to break free from that.

    So do you really want to know why you canít find high paying jobs? Itís because you spend way too much time on sites like oDesk, Freelance, Elance, Warrior Forum, Digital Point, Content Mills, etc. Sure, you might be able to make a few extra bucks or some weekend drinking money from those places, but could you honestly afford to live on them? Could you really afford your bills and keep yourself alive on the money you make from those places?

    Iím sure there are people who make a sustainable living off clients from the forums alone but that is not the normal scenario. There are also people who win the lottery but you canít rely on ridiculous odds. Let me break down why every single one of those places I just listed is absolutely awful for finding clients. You have your job boards, your marketing forums and your content mills.

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    Job Boards
    I don’t know where to begin with sites like this. These are the absolute scum of the freelancing world. Have you ever been to a Bazaar in the Middle East? While I’m sure many haven’t, it’s basically a very cheap market place. That’s honestly what a job board is like. It’s where clients post their projects and then they have qualified writers “bid” on the project.

    So what’s the issue? You’ll find writers who will bid a mere $1 per 1000 words (no, I’m not kidding) to write for these clients. No matter how low or cheap you think you can go, people will constantly outbid you on job boards. Not only that, but the clients are picky and your money is usually held by some sort of middle man escrow service until the client is satisfied. You definitely don’t want your money held until a cheap client is satisfied; you may never see your money.

    Marketing Forums

    Now, I’m not going to disrespect marketing forums like Warrior Forum or Digital Point too much, because I have found some great clients from both of those places. However, the majority of the people who go there just want super insane deals and they still want you to deliver rock star quality material.

    So what’s the issue? Anyone with common sense can figure out that no writer can afford to live off of peanut shells. At the rate the majority of the people on forums pay, they’re not even peanuts anymore, they’re peanut shells. While there are some quality clientele to be found on places like forums, they generally don’t go to forums. Every high paying client I’ve ever had was never found on a forum or any kind of job board.

    The truth is, the majority of high paying clients have no idea that places like that even exist. You see, people on forums are stuck in a world where they believe $1 per 100 words is a normal price and the standard for content writing. Corporate clients and business owners understand that high quality content impacts their site in a positive way and they’re willing to pay for it.

    Content Mills
    Ugh, I wish someone would have warned me of the woes of the content mill websites when I first started. I don’t wish anyone to be stuck writing for content mills, not even my worst enemy. So what exactly is a content mill? Basically, a content mill consists of a simple process that goes from client to writer with a middle man.

    A content mill is a website that hosts articles posted by clients to write. However instead of dealing directly with the client, the content mill acts as a middle ground. The content mill will collect the money from the client upfront and then release the money once the writer has finished their work. Now, all of that sounds pretty gravy right? No client communication, you’re guaranteed to be paid, etc.? All of that sounds wonderful and more right? Wrong.

    Here’s the catch with content mills. Most of them won’t release payment to you until the client is satisfied with the work. What’s even worse is that on sites like iWriter, they can flat out just reject your article and put the article back into the order pool for more writers to take up. When you go to a site like iWriter, you’re going to notice that there are literally a ton of clients on there who constantly need content. You’ll also notice that a majority of them have a disgustingly low rejection rate.

    I’ve received quite a few rejections myself from places like iWriter. Some clients will take the work you give them and just get free work, without ever paying you.

    There’s more than just iWriter out there though, there’s also sites like Textbroker. Now, Textbroker is one of the better content mills because they always pay on time and they have superb customer service. Textbroker is one of those sites that has so much potential to be great. The editing team is where they fall severely short. When you first start writing for Textbroker, you’ll be asked to do 5 articles and then an editorial team must rate your work before you can continue any further.

    The problem is, the editors are EXTREMELY picky. I don’t mean mildly, I mean extremely picky. If you misuse or misplace one single comma, they will bump you down an entire tier and leave you to write for $1 per 100 word clients. Not only that, but the premium (Level 4) rate only $1.25 to $1.50 per 100 words. You’re being held to a standard that only professionals use for a mere $7 per article? It’s a complete joke.

    To make a long story short, avoid content mill websites like the plague. One of the most annoying features of content mills is payout periods and client acceptance rates. A client on a content mill may have 96 hours (like on Textbroker) to accept an article. Guess what? The payouts can only be processed Thursday night and paid Friday, so if you don’t get your articles in before Sunday night, there’s a chance you might not be paid for any articles you do that week. It’s highly annoying but clients and Textbroker’s staff seems to be in love with the rule.

    I used to use content mill websites as a crutch to help me make a little extra money for holidays or bills. Now though, I honestly don’t wish content mills on my worst enemy.

    So do you see now why you can’t find high paying jobs? Is the picture becoming slightly clearer with this section? High paying clients don’t visit the areas you’re used to frequenting. Clients that pay a distinct and high price don’t go to places like iWriter, Textbroker, Digital Point or the Warrior Forums. I’m not saying it’s impossible to find high paying clients there but you’re better off begging for money with a tin can outside your house than you are looking for high paying clients in those places.

    All that time you’ve been spending trying to get some client from a forum to pay you a mere $15 per article will likely go unnoticed. There are thousands of people that lurk on those forums willing to sell themselves out for the price of a typical American McDonalds meal. A mere $5 to $7 total for a well-researched and high quality article is basically the price they’ll go to. They’ll often be disappointed and end up coming right back to find new writers, but that’s the thing you have to understand about cheap clients.

    Cheap clientele never learn their lesson and they never progress to higher paid writers. They will always be searching for cheap gold mines and hoping that some cheap writer will make them rich with content. That’s the thing you have to understand as well, is that they’re never going to change. You will never convince a $1 client to up his price to $5 per 100 words, because they don’t see content as having that much value. They would much rather waste their time, effort and money on writers that are desperately looking to crank out as many words as possible.

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